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15 AUGUST IS FERRAGOSTO – THE ITALIAN SUMMER FESTIVAL

After Christmas, Ferragosto is the second most important festivity in Italy. The most awaited festival corresponds with the beginning of the summer holidays and brings a stream of Italian visitors to the beaches and the cities. If you would like to go out on the night of Ferragosto, make sure to book a table in your favourite restaurant. Also, note that most shops are closed for the festivities.

The Ferragosto finds its origins in ancient Rome and was later interwoven with the Catholic tradition. The name Ferragosto comes from the Latin feriae Augusti (rest of Augustus), in honor of Octavian Augustus, the first Roman emperor, from which the month of August takes its name. It was a period of rest and celebration established by the emperor himself during which a number of parties celebrated the end of the agricultural labour.

Throughout the Empire festivals and horse races took place, draft animals were adorned with flowers. In addition, it was custom for the farmers to express their best wishes to the landowners, in exchange for a small tip.

Posted by Patricia at www.simplychillout.com
#sardinia #ferragosto #festival #festivities #culture #tradtion

MASKS, DISGUISES, SATIRE AND BIZARRE PANTOMIME

The Carnival, the only festivity not linked to Catholic liturgy, is deep rooted in the Sardinian culture. Across the island the festivities start with the bonfires of Saint Anthony on 17th January while the main celebrations take place between Ash Thursday and Ash Tuesday to conclude on Ash Wednesday. Interestingly the main carnival characters vary quite strongly from region to region.

The Carnival often recalls archaic rites, where the year end is represented by a king or queen (in Tempio Pausiania) or by a rag puppet that is tried, condemned to the stake and afterwards mourned with a ridiculous funeral whine (in Bosa, Maimone, Cagliari).

In the center of the island, Carnival often features mute masks of ancient origin such as Mamuthones and Issohadores (Mamoiada), Boes and Merdules (Ottana) and Sos Thuros (Orotelli).

Especially in the region of Oristano, equistrian performances are at the heart of the Carnival (e.g. Sartiglia in Oristano, Sa carrela ‘nanti in Santulussurgiu, Sa corsa e sa pudda in Ghilarza).

No matter where you decide to go, the Carnival is usually accompanied by beans with bacon, fritters (kind of donuts) and plenty of local wine. Have fun!

Photo: Maurizio Aresi by www.sardiniaturismo.eu
Posted by Patricia at www.simplychillout.com

#sardinia #italy #carnival #celebration #culture #carnevale #sardegna #sardinien #italien #kultur #feier #fasnacht

SAFFRON – THE SPICE BEYOND PRICE

The story goes that the saffron plant, originated in Greece, is the fruit of Crocus’ love for the nymph Smilax. As the gods were opposed to this love affair they transformed Crocus into a saffron plant and Smilax into a bindweed … Hermes, lovers’ adviser, used the plant as an aphrodisiac spice

The plant has arrived in Italy thanks to the Dominican priest Santucci. Today Sardinia and more precisely the villages of Villanovafranca, Turri and San Gavino produce yearly about 300 kg of high quality saffron with PDO (Protected Designation of Origin) recognition.

Why not not join the yearly Saffron Festival in San Gavino Monreale which take place at mid November? A very good way indeed for learning about and tasting this mystic spice!

For more information, check http://www.sangavinomonreale.net/2015/11/07/il-programma-della-sagra-dello-zafferano/.

Photo: San Gavino Montreale

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A BIT OF LOCAL ANCIENT HISTORY

In the heart of the village of Domus de Maria near Chia you will find the local museum (or Museo Civico), which displays archaeological finds belonging to the ancient city of Bithia as well as a numismatic and a mineralogical collection.

The objects of greatest interest are those found during the excavations in the sixties and eighties in Bithia that brought to light interesting pieces of historical and cultural value such as the sandstone statue of the god Bes, a bull-god represented with the right arm raised to greet the sacred “betili” stones that ancient people laid in the areas of worship.

To enrich the collection of the museum are mainly the archaeological finds from the ancient necropolis of Bithia, near the Tower of Chia, from common pottery to flask-shaped containers dating from the sixth century BC. Several rooms of the museum are dedicated to more modern handicrafts and local produces.

The museum is located in Piazza Vittorio Emanuele in Domus de Maria and open daily in the summer, upon request for the remaining of the year. Entrance: € 1,60 for adults and € 1,00 for children.

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#sardinia #domusdemaria #chia #bithia #museum #archeology #history #culture

SA CARAPIGNA – THE TRADITIONAL HAND-MADE LEMON SORBET

Maintaining and promoting Sardinian culinary traditions across the nation is a young man’s dream, Sebastiano Pranteddu of Aritzo (central Sardinia).

The Sardinian carapigna differs from other icy compositions because ice is not an ingredient itself, though over time the original slush has probably evolved to a more refined sorbet through the use of the “barrile”, which holds the “carapignera”.

The technology used is to refrigerate a metallic container filled with water, sugar and organic lemon juice surrounded by a mixture of ice and salt. The container is manually turned in very rapid movements to create an icy crust inside the container.

Check out this interesting video that shows the making of the original carapigna: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TARnev4xUMU

Photo: guida-sardegna.it

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#sardinia #sorbet #carapigna #icecream #tradition #culture

UP AND COMING – SANT’EFISIO FESTIVAL

Ramadura

One of the most important and spectacular events in Sardinia is the festival of Sant’Efisio which takes place on 1-4th May every year. For this occasion the streets of Cagliari and Pula in particular are completely covered with petals of roses to honor the saint and give way to the parade. In Sardinian this is called “Sa Ramadura”. More info to come on this event: http://www.visitpula.info/santefisio-a-pula/.

Photo: www.sardegnadigitallibrary.it

 

CHESTNUTS AND HAZELNUTS FESTIVAL

The popular festival is held annually on the last Sunday of October at Aritzo, in the heart of Barbagia.The event is a great opportunity to raise awareness of local products, cultural heritage, environment and art of central Sardinia.

During two days (Saturday and Sunday) the festival features musical performances and art exhibitions, while roasted hazelnuts and chestnuts will be distributed together with an excellent new wine. Yet another cultural event not to be missed!

Shared by Patricia at www.simplychillout.com

#sardinia #barbagia #chestnut #hazelnut #gastronomy #event #culture

Originally shared by +Orgo Solo

Chi vuol favorire?
Pitzinna venditrice di castagne a Belvì

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MUSIC TO THE EARS … AND PALATE

The Pane Carasau is a typical Sardinian bread originating from Barbagia, now widespread throughout the island. This very crispy bread, also known as Carta da Musica (music paper), can be found in all grocery stores and is often served in restaurants. The dough is made of yeast, salt, water and wheat flour or barley flour. Variations of it are the Pane Guttiau and Pane Frattau.

The Pane Guttiau is wetted with a few drops of olive oil, salt and lightly toasted in the oven or on the grill, mostly served as an appetizer. Interestingly the Pane Frattau forms a kind of lasagna made of Pane Carasau. The bread is immersed for a very short time in boiling salted water, and then is disposed on a plate, alternating layers of tomato sauce and grated cheese, with the possible addition of a poached egg which is cooked in same water. Buon appetito!

For more information about the preparation of this delicious bread, see http://www.academiabarilla.com/the-italian-food-academy/bread-pasta-starchy-foods/pane-carasau.aspx

Photo: http://algheroholidays.weebly.com/
Written by Patricia at www.simplychillout.com

#sardinia #specialty #cooking #bread #culture #panecarasau #frattau #guttiau

THE SARDINIAN VERSION OF HALLOWEEN

Although Halloween is becoming more and more popular in Italy, Sardinia has its own way of celebrating the souls, which is called “Is Animeddas” or “Panixeddas” in the south and “Su mortu mortu” in the central part of the island.

The Sardinian version of Halloween goes back to an ancient tradition which celebrates the goodness of the souls on All Saints day (1st November). Here too appears the theme of carved pumpkins and children dressed as ghosts who knock at the doors asking for gifts or else threatening with tricks.

Originally, homemade goodies such as pabassinas, su pani de saba, and especially a biscuit called ossu de mottu (dead’s bones) along with pomegranates, chestnuts and dried fruit were given to the kids. The tradition was to light an oil lamp to honor each deceased member of the family. Happy Halloween!

Photo: http://maestramanu-ifantastici20.blogspot.ch/

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#sardinia #tradition #culture #isanimeddas #halloween

EUROPEAN HERITAGE DAY – YOUR CHANCE TO DISCOVER THE MYSTICAL BEAUTY OF NORA, NEAR PULA

For all those who are now enjoying the late Summer in South Sardinia, on Saturday 24th and Sunday 25th 2017 September you will have the opportunity to participate to a guided tour of the Tower of Nora (Torre del Coltellazzo), the Nora Archeological Site and the Submarine Archeological Exhibition in Casa Frau, on the Piazza del Popolo (main square of Pula). The guided tours take place all day for a symbolic price of 1 euro. Don’t miss it!

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#sardinia #nora #excursion #tour #archeologicalsite #tower #pula #exhibition #culture #event